CHAMPS Charter High School of the Arts - Multimedia and Performing

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Assignments

12th Grade English

Instructor
Bret Polish
Term
2017-2018 School Year
Department
Independent Study
Description

Welcome to 12th Grade English with Mr. Polish! Our class will meet every Friday from 10:30 – 11:30 am and your attendance there is required. Because we only meet one day a week, it is important that you maintain communication with me by e-mail if you are having any issues with me, school, or the work. My e-mail is bpolish@champscharter.org and I check it every day so expect me to get back to you no more than 24 hours after you have messaged me.

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Past Assignments

Due:

Final Notebooks due Friday with 2 RAPs (3 sentences each), 1 journal (10 sentence) and notes from every day of class.

Extra Credit:  Write your own ending to Parable of the Sower.

Journal Assignment:  How should we prepare for the future?

RAP 1: Is the future world of Parable of the Sower realistic?

RAP 2:  What did you like/dislike about your classes this year?  What did you learn from your time at CHAMPs?

Due:

Parable of the Sower Essay Final Draft

How should Americans prepare for the future? 

Using specific examples from Parable of the Sower explain how people in the U.S. can prevent a dystopian future.  Be sure to cite at least six quotes to support your argument.

Due:

Parable of the Sower Book Club Projects

CHAPTERS 1 - 5 MARISABEL, IAIN, RYAN

CHAPTERS 6 - 10 CIRCE, CEDRIC, NICOLAS

CHAPTERS 11 - 15 PHILENA, BARBARA

CHAPTERS 16 - 20 JORDYN, ZOE

CHAPTERS 21 - 25 ODESSA, BAILEY

CHAPTERS 1 - 13 CAMDEN

CHAPTERS 14 - 25 LUKE AND ACACIA

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not. 
    1. Essential questions are universally applicable and can be answered by anybody, even if they have not read the book. In other words, do not directly refer to the book in any of your questions.  Additionally, do not use the word “you” in any of your questions as that limits the universality of the questions.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.
    1. Not coming to class prepared to do your book club will lead to the automatic deduction of two grades on the project. As with all assignments, the later you turn it in, the less points you get.

Due:

Parable of the Sower Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for the entirety of Parable of the Sower.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Notebooks due Friday with 2 RAPs (3 sentences each), 1 journal (10 sentence) and notes from every day of class.

Journal Assignment:  How important is money to you?

RAP 1:  What happens at the end of Song of Solomon?  What does this mean?

RAP 2:  What do you think the U.S. will look like in ten years?

Due:

Song of Solomon Final Draft Essay

What makes a person who he or she is? 

Using specific examples from Song of Solomon write a five paragraph essay explaining the forces that shape people and the decisions they make.  Be sure to cite at least six quotes to support your argument.

Due:

Song of Solomon Book Club Projects

LUKE, CAMDEN = CHAPTERS 8 - 11

JORDYN, PHILENA CHAPTER 8

RYAN, NICOLAS CHAPTER 9

ODESSA, CEDRIC CHAPTER 10

BAILEY, MARISABEL CHAPTER 11

CIRCE, ZOE CHAPTER 12

IAIN CHAPTER 13

BARBARA CHAPTER 14

ACACIA = CHAPTERS 12 - 15

 

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not. 
    1. Essential questions are universally applicable and can be answered by anybody, even if they have not read the book. In other words, do not directly refer to the book in any of your questions.  Additionally, do not use the word “you” in any of your questions as that limits the universality of the questions.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.
    1. Not coming to class prepared to do your book club will lead to the automatic deduction of two grades on the project. As with all assignments, the later you turn it in, the less points you get.

Due:

Song of Solomon Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for Chapters 8 - 15 of Song of Solomon.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Song of Solomon Book Club Projects

CAMDEN CHAPTERS 1 - 3

ACACIA 1 - 3

PHILENA  CHAPTER 1

MARISABEL CHAPTER 1

JORDYN CHAPTER 2

BAILEY CHAPTER 2

CIRCE CHAPTER 3

BARBARA CHAPTER 4

LUKE CHAPTERS 4 - 7

IAIN CHAPTER 5

ZOE CHAPTER 5

RYAN CHAPTER 6

NICOLAS CHAPTER 6

ODESSA CHAPTER 7

CEDRIC CHAPTER 7

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not. 
    1. Essential questions are universally applicable and can be answered by anybody, even if they have not read the book. In other words, do not directly refer to the book in any of your questions.  Additionally, do not use the word “you” in any of your questions as that limits the universality of the questions.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.
    1. Not coming to class prepared to do your book club will lead to the automatic deduction of two grades on the project. As with all assignments, the later you turn it in, the less points you get.

Due:

Song of Solomon Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for Chapters 1 - 7 of Song of Solomon.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Notebooks due Friday with 2 RAPs (3 sentences each), 1 journal (10 sentence) and notes from every day of class.

Journal Assignment:  What role does your family’s culture play in your life?

RAP 1:  What was life like for black people in the early 20th century?

RAP 2:  Does Milkman have a healthy relationship with his mother?  Why/why not?

Due:

No Impact Man Essay Final Draft

Should Americans aspire to be “no impact” people? 

Using specific examples from No Impact Man explain whether or not people in the U.S. should try to be like Colin Beavan.  Be sure to cite at least six quotes to support your argument.

Due:

Notebooks due Friday with 2 RAPs (3 sentences each), 1 journal (10 sentence) and notes from every day of class.

Journal Assignment:  Will changing individual behavior solve our world’s environmental problems?  Why/why not?

RAP 1:  Are the changes Colin Beavan has made so far extreme?  Why/Why not?

RAP 2:  What did Colin Beavan learn from his experiment?

Due:

No Impact Man Book Club Projects

Odessa/Iain 6

Philena, Cedric 7

Camden 6 & 7

Luke 8 & 9

Acacia 9 & Epilogue

Bailey, Circe 8

Barbara, Ryan 9

Nicolas, Jordyn Epilogue

 

 

 

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not. 
    1. Essential questions are universally applicable and can be answered by anybody, even if they have not read the book. In other words, do not directly refer to the book in any of your questions.  Additionally, do not use the word “you” in any of your questions as that limits the universality of the questions.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.
    1. Not coming to class prepared to do your book club will lead to the automatic deduction of two grades on the project. As with all assignments, the later you turn it in, the less points you get.

Due:

No Impact Man Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for Chapters 6 - the Epilogue of No Impact Man.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

No Impact Man Book Club Projects

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not. 
    1. Essential questions are universally applicable and can be answered by anybody, even if they have not read the book. In other words, do not directly refer to the book in any of your questions.  Additionally, do not use the word “you” in any of your questions as that limits the universality of the questions.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.
    1. Not coming to class prepared to do your book club will lead to the automatic deduction of two grades on the project. As with all assignments, the later you turn it in, the less points you get.

Due:

No Impact Man Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for Chapters 1 - 5 of No Impact Man.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Bring your copy of Colin Beavan's No Impact Man to class.

Due:

Notebooks due Friday with 2 RAPs (3 sentences each), 1 journal (10 sentence) and notes from every day of class.

Journal Assignment:  What kind of economic system should the U.S. have?

RAP 1:  Is America's political system broken?  Why/why not?

RAP 2:  What are some of the biggest environmental problems facing the world today?

Due:

Aftershock Essay Final Draft

What causes economic downturns?  How should the U.S. government deal with an economic downturn? 

Using specific examples from Aftershock explain what the government should to prevent and fix economic depressions.  Be sure to cite at least six quotes to support your argument.

Due:

Aftershock Essay Rough Draft

What causes economic downturns?  How should the U.S. government deal with an economic downturn? 

Using specific examples from Aftershock explain what the government should to prevent and fix economic depressions.  Be sure to cite at least six quotes to support your argument.

Due:

Notebooks due Friday with 2 RAPs (3 sentences each), 1 journal (10 sentence) and notes from every day of class.

Journal Assignment:  What kind of role should the government play in the economy?

RAP 1:  How unequal is the U.S. today?

RAP 2:  What is Robert Reich’s bias in Aftershock?  Do you agree with this bias?  Why/why not?

Due:

Aftershock Book Club Projects

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not. 
    1. Essential questions are universally applicable and can be answered by anybody, even if they have not read the book. In other words, do not directly refer to the book in any of your questions.  Additionally, do not use the word “you” in any of your questions as that limits the universality of the questions.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.
    1. Not coming to class prepared to do your book club will lead to the automatic deduction of two grades on the project. As with all assignments, the later you turn it in, the less points you get.

Due:

Aftershock Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for the Part 1, Chapter 11 -- the End of Aftershock.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Aftershock Book Club Projects

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not. 
    1. Essential questions are universally applicable and can be answered by anybody, even if they have not read the book. In other words, do not directly refer to the book in any of your questions.  Additionally, do not use the word “you” in any of your questions as that limits the universality of the questions.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.
    1. Not coming to class prepared to do your book club will lead to the automatic deduction of two grades on the project. As with all assignments, the later you turn it in, the less points you get.

Due:

Aftershock Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for the Introduction -- Part 1, Chapter 10 of Aftershock.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Notebooks due Friday with 2 RAPs (3 sentences each), 1 journal (10 sentences), and notes from every day of class.

Journal:  Can inequality be a good thing?

RAP 1:  Should we ever judge the poor?

RAP 2:  How seriously should we take the advice of economists?

Due:

Bring your copy of Robert Reich's Aftershock (the Inequality for All Tie-In Edition) to class.  Your version should look like this:

Due:

The Working Poor Essay Final Draft

What causes poverty?  How can the government put an end to poverty in the U.S.?

In this essay, you are to explain the different causes of poverty as well as the solutions to it using evidence from The Working Poor by David K. Shipler.  You must provide at least six quotes from the book to support your argument.

Due:

The Working Poor Essay Rough Draft

What causes poverty?  How can the government put an end to poverty in the U.S.?

In this essay, you are to explain the different causes of poverty as well as the solutions to it using evidence from The Working Poor by David K. Shipler.  You must provide at least six quotes from the book to support your argument.

Due:

Notebooks due Friday with 2 RAPs (3 sentences each), 1 journal (10 sentences), and notes from every day of class.

Journal:  What should the government do about poverty in the U.S.?

RAP 1:  How should the government measure poverty?

RAP 2:  How does the cycle of poverty work?

Due:

The Working Poor Book Club Projects

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not. 
    1. Essential questions are universally applicable and can be answered by anybody, even if they have not read the book. In other words, do not directly refer to the book in any of your questions.  Additionally, do not use the word “you” in any of your questions as that limits the universality of the questions.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.
    1. Not coming to class prepared to do your book club will lead to the automatic deduction of two grades on the project. As with all assignments, the later you turn it in, the less points you get.

Due:

The Working Poor Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for the Chapter 8 - Epilogue of The Working Poor.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

The Working Poor Book Club Projects

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not. 
    1. Essential questions are universally applicable and can be answered by anybody, even if they have not read the book. In other words, do not directly refer to the book in any of your questions.  Additionally, do not use the word “you” in any of your questions as that limits the universality of the questions.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.
    1. Not coming to class prepared to do your book club will lead to the automatic deduction of two grades on the project. As with all assignments, the later you turn it in, the less points you get.

Due:

The Working Poor Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for the Chapter 4 - Chapter 7 of The Working Poor.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Notebooks due Friday with 2 RAPs (3 sentences each), 1 journal (10 sentences), and notes from every day of class.
Journal: Why are some people poor while others are not?
RAP 1: What makes a person poor?
RAP 2: Should a person who works full time be poor? Why/why not?

Due:

The Working Poor Book Club Projects

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not. 
    1. Essential questions are universally applicable and can be answered by anybody, even if they have not read the book. In other words, do not directly refer to the book in any of your questions.  Additionally, do not use the word “you” in any of your questions as that limits the universality of the questions.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.
    1. Not coming to class prepared to do your book club will lead to the automatic deduction of two grades on the project. As with all assignments, the later you turn it in, the less points you get.

Due:

The Working Poor Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for the Preface - Chapter 3 of The Working Poor.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Students and parents/guardians must print and sign the attached Parent/Guardian Permission Slip and turn it in to Mr. Polish.

Due:

Bring your copy of The Working Poor by David Shipler to class.

Due:

Freedom Final Essay (DUE BY 8:15 AM FRIDAY -- NO EXTENSIONS)

How should freedom be defined?

In this essay, you are to explain what freedom should and should not be using specific examples from Freedom by Jonathan Franzen.  You must provide at least six quotes from the book to support your argument.

Due:

Notebooks due with 2 RAPs (3 sentences), 1 journal (10 sentences), and notes from every day of class.

Journal:  How much freedom should parents give a teenager?

RAP 1:  Is Richard a good friend to Walter?  Why/why not?

RAP 2:  Is Joey a bad son?  Why/why not?

Due:

Freedom Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for Book 3 Chapter 5 (Bad News) through the end of Freedom.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize the section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Freedom Book Club Projects 

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.

Due:

Freedom Book Club Projects 

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.

Due:

Freedom Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for Part 3 Chapters 1 - 4 of Freedom (Mountaintop Removal - Enough Already).

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize the section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Freedom Book Club Projects 

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

  1. Summarize your assigned chapter(s).
  2. Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.
  3. Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme. An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not.
  4. Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes. Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”
  5. Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions. For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”
  6. Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.
  7. Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.
  8. Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.

Due:

Freedom Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for Parts 1 - Part 2 (Mistake were Made all three chapters) of Freedom.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize the section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Notebooks due with 2 RAPs (3 sentences), 1 journal (10 sentences), and notes from every day of class.

Journal:  If you could re-do high school all over again to be more prepared for college, what would you do differently?

RAP 1:  What does freedom mean to you?

RAP 2:  Is Patty a good wife and a good mother?  Why/why not?

Due:

Bring your copy of Jonathan Franzen's Freedom to class.

Due:

UC/Cal State Application Project

Regardless of whether you want to actually go to a UC or a Cal State, it never hurts to apply to a college as a back-up (Cedric Jennings knows this lesson all too well).  For this assignment, you must complete the entire UC/Cal State application and either print your work or take pictures of it to show to your teacher.  Even if you do not plan on going to any of these schools, you are expected to do this assignment because you never know where you can get in and, by next Fall, you just might have changed your mind about your life’s path.

If there is any information on your application (i.e. social security number, address) that you do not want your teacher to know, please black it out.  If you are applying to a UC, you need to go to this website:

http://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/how-to-apply/apply-online/index.html

If you are applying to a Cal State, you need to go through this website:

http://www.csumentor.edu/admissionapp/undergrad_apply.asp

Your grade will be based on whether or not you thoroughly and completely fill out the application.  If you have any questions, please contact me at bpolish@champscharter.org

Due:

Common Application Essay Final Draft

Based on your college research as well as everything you have learned from reading A Hope in the Unseen, you will be writing an essay for the Common Application.  The Common Application is used by over 600 colleges so the odds are that at least one of the colleges you want to go to expects you to do this.  If you are at a loss as to what to write about yourself, you may write your essay as if you were Cedric Jennings.   Since this is a personal essay, you may use "I," but you should still avoid "you," "we," and "our."  Though you will only be writing one essay, there are five prompts for you to choose from:

  1. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.
  2. The lessons we take from obstacles we encountercan be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure.How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

    3. Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?
    4. Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma - anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution
    5. Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.
    6. Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more    7. Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.

For the purposes of this assignment, your essay may be as long as you like.  However, if you do plan on using it, your essay must ultimately fall under the 650 word limit (250 words minimum).

For extra credit, you may also do the UC Personal Insight Questions, which can be found here:

http://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/how-to-apply/personal-questions/freshman/index.html

 

Due:

Notebooks due with 2 RAPs (3 sentences), 1 journal (10 sentences), and notes from every day of class.

Journal:  If you could go to any college in the world, where would you go?  Why would you go here?

RAP 1:  Why is it important to apply to colleges (even if you are not currently interested in college or don't think you have a chance of getting in)?

RAP 2:  What do you think colleges want to hear in your personal statement?

Due:

Common Application Essay Rough Draft

Based on your college research as well as everything you have learned from reading A Hope in the Unseen, you will be writing an essay for the Common Application.  The Common Application is used by over 600 colleges so the odds are that at least one of the colleges you want to go to expects you to do this.  If you are at a loss as to what to write about yourself, you may write your essay as if you were Cedric Jennings.   Since this is a personal essay, you may use "I," but you should still avoid "you," "we," and "our."  Though you will only be writing one essay, there are five prompts for you to choose from:

  1. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.
  2. The lessons we take from obstacles we encountercan be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure.How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

    3. Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?
    4. Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma - anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution
    5. Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.
    6. Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more    7. Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.

For the purposes of this assignment, your essay may be as long as you like.  However, if you do plan on using it, your essay must ultimately fall under the 650 word limit (250 words minimum).

For extra credit, you may also do the UC Personal Insight Questions, which can be found here:

http://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/how-to-apply/personal-questions/freshman/index.html

 

Due:

Notebooks due with 3 RAPs (3 sentences each for regular English/6 sentences each for Honors English), 1 journal (10 sentences for regular English and 20 sentences for Honors English), and notes from every day of class.

Journal:  What are some of the most important lessons Cedric Jennings learned in college?

RAP 1:  Given Cedric's experiences, would you want to go to Brown University?  Why/why not?

RAP 2:  What are the dream and safety schools you are considering applying to?

Due:

College Presentations Project

With high school just about over and college application deadlines right around the corner, now is the time to start thinking about college if you have not already mapped out your next steps.  Even if you don’t plan on going to college, it’s always a good idea to know what your options are just in case you change your mind.  To help your peers make up their minds, you are going to do a presentation on three colleges:  your reach school, a UC, and a safety school (such as a Cal State). 

Using the college’s own website, college guides, our school’s counselors, and the College Board website (www.collegeboard.org), you need to find out the following information:

  1. THE SCHOOL ITSELF
    1. What is this school best known for?
    2. Where is this school located?
      1. What kinds of housing options will be available to you?
    3. What kinds of programs does it offer?
    4. What distinguishes this school from other schools?
  1. THE STUDENT BODY
    1. How many students go to this school?
    2. What is the average class size?
    3. What is the racial/ethnic make-up of the school?
    4. What is the gender make-up of the school?
  1. THE COST
    1. How much is annual tuition?
    2. How much is dorm housing?
    3. How much are their meal plans?
    4. How much does it cost to apply to this school?
    5. What kind of financial aid does this school offer?
  1. APPLYING
    1. What kinds of things is the school looking for in its students?
    2. What is the average GPA of the students who are accepted to the school?
    3. What are the average SAT scores of the students who are accepted to this school?
    4. What is the application deadline for this school?

All of this information should be put onto a visually appealing powerpoint/poster with at least 5 pictures.

Due:

A Hope in the Unseen Final Draft Essay

Is it possible to overcome adversity?  Using at least six quotes and examples from A Hope in the Unseen, explain whether or not the oppressed can surmount all obstacles.

Due:

A Hope in the Unseen Rough Draft Essay

Is it possible to overcome adversity?  Using at least six quotes and examples from A Hope in the Unseen, explain whether or not the oppressed can surmount all obstacles.

Due:

Notebooks due with 3 RAPs (3 sentences each for regular English/6 sentences each for Honors English), 1 journal (10 sentences for regular English and 20 sentences for Honors English), and notes from every day of class.

Journal:  Is college as important to you as it is to Cedric Jennings?  Why/why not?

RAP 1:  What is Cedric's experience in college like?  Does this match your expectations of college?  Why/why not?

RAP 2:  Was Cedric prepared for college? Why/why not?

Due:

A Hope in the Unseen EXTRA CREDIT Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for chapters 11 - 15 of A Hope in the Unseen.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

A Hope in the Unseen EXTRA CREDIT Book Club Project (CHAPTERS 11 - 15)

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

Summarize your assigned chapter(s).

Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.

Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme.  An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not.

Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes.  Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”

Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions.  For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”

Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.

Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.

Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.

Due:

Resource Project:
An in-class project testing students' knowledge of A Hope in the Unseen.

Due:

A Hope in the Unseen Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for chapters 6 - 10 of A Hope in the Unseen.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

A Hope in the Unseen Book Club Projects

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

Summarize your assigned chapter(s).

Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.

Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme.  An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not.

Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes.  Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”

Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions.  For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”

Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.

Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.

Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.

Due:

Notebooks due the third week of class with 3 RAPs (3 sentences each for regular English/6 sentences each for Honors English), 1 journal (10 sentences for regular English and 20 sentences for Honors English), and notes from every day of class.

Journal:  Is the U.S. still an unjust society?

RAP 1:  What are some of the most serious problems you face in your life?

RAP 2:  Are you privileged?  Why/why not?

RAP 3:  What are some of the barriers that Cedric Jennings faced in trying to get to college?

Due:

A Hope in the Unseen Book Club Projects

People form book clubs to meet new people, socialize, share a good book and explore issues in literature.  Because we are a small group of people reading books together, we might as well form a book club!

In this book club, your job is to create a simple presentation of your assigned chapter(s) for your classmates.  In this presentation, you must create a powerpoint/word document in which you

Summarize your assigned chapter(s).

Explain the main theme of your chapter(s) in at least 5 sentences.

Come up with an Essential Question to ask the class based on this theme.  An essential question is a question without a right or wrong answer and can therefore lead to a discussion.  For instance, “Is there a God?” is an essential question while “What does it say on page 111 of the Koran?” is not.

Come up with 2 Sub-Questions to make sure that your discussion lasts at least 5 minutes.  Sub-questions are similar to the essential question, but are more specific and reveal the opinions of the different group members.  For instance, if the Essential Question is “Who is responsible for the Jewish Holocaust?” a good Sub-Question would be “How should Jews be compensated for their losses?”

Come up with 1 Devil’s Advocate Question that reflects a contrarian point of view and forces the group to think about their assumptions.  For instance, if the subject were the Holocaust, a Devil’s Advocate Question would be something like “Why should people today have to pay for crimes of the past?”

Create a word/powerpoint document with all of this information and send it to your teacher at bpolish@champscharter.org by 6 PM Thursday.

Print your powerpoint/word document and give it to me at the beginning of the period.

Come to class Friday prepared to stand up in front of class, present your work and lead a discussion based on your questions.

Due:

A Hope in the Unseen Reading Maps

Fill out the following three charts for the first five chapters of A Hope in the Unseen.

First, write down and describe each new character in the character chart (the narrator can also be a character).  You will also need to add information whenever we learn more about one of the main characters.  There should always be new information to add!

Under theme, write down each important theme you come across.  Themes are message/ideas in the story, such as “family ties” or “the effects of prejudice”.  Always write down a quote (with the page number) that represents this theme.  Make sure to explain each quote in at least two sentences.  You must find at least eight quotes per section.

Finally, summarize each section in no less than 20 sentences.

Due:

Students and parents/guardians must print and sign the attached Student Success Contract/Parent/Guardian Permission Slip and turn it in to Mr. Polish.

Due:

“The Trouble We’re In” Homework
READ “THE TROUBLE WE’RE IN” ARTICLE (FROM THE BOOK POWER, PRIVILEGE, AND DIFFERENCE BY ALLAN JOHNSON) IN ITS ENTIRETY AND ANSWER EACH OF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS IN YOUR OWN WORDS USING COMPLETE SENTENCES (2 SENTENCES PER QUESTION) ON A SEPARATE SHEET OF PAPER.

PART 1: AN INTRODUCTION
1. What is the author, Allan Johnson, really saying in the first paragraph of this article? Do you agree with his point? Why/why not?
PART 2: DIFFERENCE IS NOT THE PROBLEM
2. In the last paragraph of page 16, Johnson writes that “There is nothing inherently. . . (over to page 17) isn’t something we’re born with.” What’s his point here? How do you feel about this?
PART 3: MAPPING DIFFERENCE: WHO ARE WE?
3. On page 19, paragraph 4, Johnson says that “the trouble around diversity. . . or harass.” What’s your reaction to the ideas he raises in this paragraph?
4. What do you think Johnson means when he says at the top of page 21, “Clearly, diversity isn’t just about the ‘variety’ that the word. . . but only in some other world.” What does he mean here?
PART 4: THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF DIFFERENCE
5. On page 21, what does James Baldwin’s quote mean? Why do you think Johnson quotes him?
PART 5: WHAT IS PRIVILEGE?
6. How do you feel about Peggy McIntosh’s definition of privilege?
7. What points does Allan Johnson make about privilege on page 24, paragraph 3? What is your reaction to his argument?
8. What does Allan Johnson mean by the luxury of obliviousness? Why is this concept so important to grasp? How is this concept connected to Johnson’s concept that “to be white in America means not having to think about it”?
9. Why is the concept of “privilege” so hard to accept for dominant group members?
PART 6: TWO TYPES OF PRIVILEGE
10. According to Peggy McIntosh there are two types of privilege. Define each one and explain each using an example to show how they operate in society.
11. Give and explain two examples of milder and stronger forms of privilege.
12. One of the founding principles of this country is that the U.S. represents an equal opportunity meritocracy. Does the concept of privilege mean that the U.S. is not a meritocracy? Explain your answer.
PART 7: WHAT PRIVILEGE LOOKS LIKE IN EVERYDAY LIFE
13. Pick five examples of privilege that are listed between pages 27 through 33 and explain each.
14. If people are privileged, what are the four life experiences they need to examine according to Johnson on page 33? Try to explain each one.
15. What does Johnson mean when he says that “In the U.S., a person is considered a member of the lowest status group from which they have any heritage”?
PART 8: PRIVILEGE AS PARADOX
16. What does Johnson mean when he says that “Individuals are the ones who experience privilege or the lack of it, but individuals aren’t what is actually privileged”? Why is this important?
17. What are the two primary consequences of the paradox of privilege (last paragraph of page 35 and last paragraph of page 36)? What does each mean?
18. What is the corollary to being privileged without knowing it (bottom of page 37)? Explain this corollary. Why is it important to understand this?
19. Explain the meaning and important of the “paradox that privilege doesn’t necessarily make you happy.”
PART 9: OPPRESSION: THE FLIP SIDE OF PRIVILEGE
20. What point is the author trying to make when he tries to distinguish between pain and oppression?