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Assignments

AP U.S. History (Period 7)

Instructor
Bret Polish
Term
2017-2018 School Year
Department
Independent Study
Description
Welcome to AP U.S. History with Mr. Polish!  Our class will meet period 7 and your attendance there is required.  Because we will usually only meet three days a week, it is important that you maintain communication with me by e-mail if you are having any issues with me, school, or the work.  My e-mail is bpolish@champscharter.org and I check it every day so expect me to get back to you no more than 24 hours after you have messaged me.

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Due:

The ISM Project Final

Now that you know a little bit more about some of the problems in this country, you, like John Lennon, are ready to "imagine" a better world.  Therefore, your final project is an opportunity to fully express what it is that you believe and how you want to imagine the world. 

On your final, I want you to think about some of the problems in contemporary U.S. society and how we can solve them.  In this class so far, we have examined racism, sexism, heterosexism, and classism as well as some of the ideological movements that have arisen to challenge these worldviews – feminism, anti-racism, and unionism, in particular.

However, instead of simply latching on to an already established “ism,” I want you to create your own worldview, your very own “ism.”

In other words, for your final, your job is to convince the class that if everyone adopted your worldview, this world would be a better place.

Your worldview must be elucidated through a visually appealing poster or powerpoint that includes the following things:

  1. A name for your “ism.”  For instance, if you believe that the world would be a better place if everyone played a musical instrument, your worldview could be called “musicism.”
  2.  An analysis of the problem(s) that you want to solve.  This must be at least one full paragraph.
  3. 10 precepts that form your “ism.”  Precepts are statements of belief and your beliefs are things that you want people to do to create the kind of world you want to see.
  4. A paragraph-long explanation of each precept.  Therefore, your poster must include at least 11 paragraphs in total!
  5. At least 2 pictures.

Your “ism” presentation must last at least 10 minutes and include the following:

  1. An explanation of each of your precepts.
  2. Some kind of performance/skit/song/poem/activity/game that proves that your ism will make the world a better place.  For instance, if your ism is “musicism,” you might want to consider bringing a drumstick for every member of the class in order to lead a class drum session.

Past Assignments

Due:

“The Trouble We’re In” Homework
READ “THE TROUBLE WE’RE IN” ARTICLE (FROM THE BOOK POWER, PRIVILEGE, AND DIFFERENCE BY ALLAN JOHNSON) IN ITS ENTIRETY AND ANSWER EACH OF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS IN YOUR OWN WORDS USING COMPLETE SENTENCES (2 SENTENCES PER QUESTION) ON A SEPARATE SHEET OF PAPER.

PART 1: AN INTRODUCTION
1. What is the author, Allan Johnson, really saying in the first paragraph of this article? Do you agree with his point? Why/why not?
PART 2: DIFFERENCE IS NOT THE PROBLEM
2. In the last paragraph of page 16, Johnson writes that “There is nothing inherently. . . (over to page 17) isn’t something we’re born with.” What’s his point here? How do you feel about this?
PART 3: MAPPING DIFFERENCE: WHO ARE WE?
3. On page 19, paragraph 4, Johnson says that “the trouble around diversity. . . or harass.” What’s your reaction to the ideas he raises in this paragraph?
4. What do you think Johnson means when he says at the top of page 21, “Clearly, diversity isn’t just about the ‘variety’ that the word. . . but only in some other world.” What does he mean here?
PART 4: THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF DIFFERENCE
5. On page 21, what does James Baldwin’s quote mean? Why do you think Johnson quotes him?
PART 5: WHAT IS PRIVILEGE?
6. How do you feel about Peggy McIntosh’s definition of privilege?
7. What points does Allan Johnson make about privilege on page 24, paragraph 3? What is your reaction to his argument?
8. What does Allan Johnson mean by the luxury of obliviousness? Why is this concept so important to grasp? How is this concept connected to Johnson’s concept that “to be white in America means not having to think about it”?
9. Why is the concept of “privilege” so hard to accept for dominant group members?
PART 6: TWO TYPES OF PRIVILEGE
10. According to Peggy McIntosh there are two types of privilege. Define each one and explain each using an example to show how they operate in society.
11. Give and explain two examples of milder and stronger forms of privilege.
12. One of the founding principles of this country is that the U.S. represents an equal opportunity meritocracy. Does the concept of privilege mean that the U.S. is not a meritocracy? Explain your answer.
PART 7: WHAT PRIVILEGE LOOKS LIKE IN EVERYDAY LIFE
13. Pick five examples of privilege that are listed between pages 27 through 33 and explain each.
14. If people are privileged, what are the four life experiences they need to examine according to Johnson on page 33? Try to explain each one.
15. What does Johnson mean when he says that “In the U.S., a person is considered a member of the lowest status group from which they have any heritage”?
PART 8: PRIVILEGE AS PARADOX
16. What does Johnson mean when he says that “Individuals are the ones who experience privilege or the lack of it, but individuals aren’t what is actually privileged”? Why is this important?
17. What are the two primary consequences of the paradox of privilege (last paragraph of page 35 and last paragraph of page 36)? What does each mean?
18. What is the corollary to being privileged without knowing it (bottom of page 37)? Explain this corollary. Why is it important to understand this?
19. Explain the meaning and important of the “paradox that privilege doesn’t necessarily make you happy.”
PART 9: OPPRESSION: THE FLIP SIDE OF PRIVILEGE
20. What point is the author trying to make when he tries to distinguish between pain and oppression?

Due:

This outline should help you study for the APUSH test.  You should also review the step by step essay writing guide.

Due:

APUSH Review Project

With only have a few weeks left before the AP U.S. History test, you are probably already sick of listening to Mr. Polish yabber on about dates, facts, and historical figures.  To spice things up a bit (and force you to re-learn what you have already learned), you and a group of like-minded individuals will teach the class about a period in U.S. History.  If you know something well enough, that means you can teach it to others!

You must pick from one of the following periods:

WWI (Tuesday, May 1) ROQUE, ANGELO

Roaring Twenties through Great Depression (Thursday, May 3) ELISA, LINDSAY, AND JASMINE

WWII through Cold War (Thursday, May 3) MICHELLE, KAT, ABBY

Eisenhower through LBJ (Thursday, May 3) ERIN AND CRAIG

Once you pick a period to present on, you must read the corresponding review reading on the class website to come up with a lesson.  Your lesson must last between 25 and 35 minutes and include the following things:

 A Powerpoint/Poster with at least 15 pictures/political cartoons/video clips

  1. A thorough 3 – 5 page outline that covers all of the important dates, figures, and events from the review reading. You must e-mail me this outline by 1 pm the day of your presentation so I can assign it to the rest of the class.
  2. Some kind of skit, song, poem, activity, game, or video (that you have made) that brings an important event from this period to life.
  3. A 5 – 10 question multiple choice quiz on what your students should have learned.

Due:

APUSH Review Project

With only have a few weeks left before the AP U.S. History test, you are probably already sick of listening to Mr. Polish yabber on about dates, facts, and historical figures.  To spice things up a bit (and force you to re-learn what you have already learned), you and a group of like-minded individuals will teach the class about a period in U.S. History.  If you know something well enough, that means you can teach it to others!

You must pick from one of the following periods:

Late 1800s (Tuesday, May 1) ETHAN, ISABELLE, ALEXA

Imperialism through Progressivism (Tuesday, May 1) ARI, TAYLOR

WWI (Tuesday, May 1) ROQUE, ANGELO

Roaring Twenties through Great Depression (Thursday, May 3) ELISA, LINDSAY, AND JASMINE

WWII through Cold War (Thursday, May 3) MICHELLE, KAT, ABBY

Eisenhower through LBJ (Thursday, May 3) ERIN AND CRAIG

Once you pick a period to present on, you must read the corresponding review reading on the class website to come up with a lesson.  Your lesson must last between 25 and 35 minutes and include the following things:

 

  1. A Powerpoint/Poster with at least 15 pictures/political cartoons/video clips
  2. A thorough 3 – 5 page outline that covers all of the important dates, figures, and events from the review reading. You must e-mail me this outline by 1 pm the day of your presentation so I can assign it to the rest of the class.
  3. Some kind of skit, song, poem, activity, game, or video (that you have made) that brings an important event from this period to life.
  4. A 5 – 10 question multiple choice quiz on what your students should have learned.

Due:

Fill out the attached outline based on the attached review reading.
 

Due:

APUSH Review Project

With only have a few weeks left before the AP U.S. History test, you are probably already sick of listening to Mr. Polish yabber on about dates, facts, and historical figures.  To spice things up a bit (and force you to re-learn what you have already learned), you and a group of like-minded individuals will teach the class about a period in U.S. History.  If you know something well enough, that means you can teach it to others!

Colonial America (Thursday, April 26) JOSE, SARAH, DEISY

American Revolution through the Constitution (Thursday, April 26) KENNIE AND VALERIA 

Jefferson through Jackson (Thursday, April 26) LEILANA CHARLOTTE

Civil War through Reconstruction (Monday, April 30) NATALIE, JULIA, AND DARA

Late 1800s (Tuesday, May 1) ETHAN, ISABELLE, ALEXA

Imperialism through Progressivism (Tuesday, May 1) ARI, TAYLOR

WWI (Tuesday, May 1) ROQUE, ANGELO

Roaring Twenties through Great Depression (Thursday, May 3) ELISA, LINDSAY, AND JASMINE

WWII through Cold War (Thursday, May 3) MICHELLE, KAT, ABBY

Eisenhower through LBJ (Thursday, May 3) ERIN AND CRAIG

Once you pick a period to present on, you must read the corresponding review reading on the class website to come up with a lesson.  Your lesson must last between 25 and 35 minutes and include the following things:

 

  1. A Powerpoint/Poster with at least 15 pictures/political cartoons/video clips
  2. A thorough 3 – 5 page outline that covers all of the important dates, figures, and events from the review reading. You must e-mail me this outline by 1 pm the day of your presentation so I can assign it to the rest of the class.
  3. Some kind of skit, song, poem, activity, game, or video (that you have made) that brings an important event from this period to life.
  4. A 5 – 10 question multiple choice quiz on what your students should have learned.

Due:

APUSH Review Project

With only have a few weeks left before the AP U.S. History test, you are probably already sick of listening to Mr. Polish yabber on about dates, facts, and historical figures.  To spice things up a bit (and force you to re-learn what you have already learned), you and a group of like-minded individuals will teach the class about a period in U.S. History.  If you know something well enough, that means you can teach it to others!

Colonial America (Thursday, April 26) JOSE, SARAH, DEISY

American Revolution through the Constitution (Thursday, April 26) KENNIE AND VALERIA 

Jefferson through Jackson (Thursday, April 26) LEILANA, CHARLOTTE

Civil War through Reconstruction (Monday, April 30) NATALIE, JULIA, AND DARA

Late 1800s (Tuesday, May 1) ETHAN, ISABELLE, ALEXA

Imperialism through Progressivism (Tuesday, May 1) ARI, TAYLOR

WWI (Tuesday, May 1) ROQUE, ANGELO

Roaring Twenties through Great Depression (Thursday, May 3) ELISA, LINDSAY, AND JASMINE

WWII through Cold War (Thursday, May 3) MICHELLE, KAT, ABBY

Eisenhower through LBJ (Thursday, May 3) ERIN AND CRAIG

Once you pick a period to present on, you must read the corresponding review reading on the class website to come up with a lesson.  Your lesson must last between 25 and 35 minutes and include the following things:

 

  1. A Powerpoint/Poster with at least 15 pictures/political cartoons/video clips
  2. A thorough 3 – 5 page outline that covers all of the important dates, figures, and events from the review reading. You must e-mail me this outline by 1 pm the day of your presentation so I can assign it to the rest of the class.
  3. Some kind of skit, song, poem, activity, game, or video (that you have made) that brings an important event from this period to life.
  4. A 5 – 10 question multiple choice quiz on what your students should have learned.

Due:

Students took a multiple choice + DBQ test on everything we have learned so far.  The DBQ will cover a topic from the period between 1945 and 1991.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
 

George W. Bush, 9/11, Osama bin Laden, Operation Enduring Freedom, Axis of Evil, Lawrence v. Texas, Bush Doctrine, Neoconservatism, Guantanamo Bay, Hamdi v. Rumsfeld, Operation Iraqi Freedom, Patriot Act, Abu Ghraib, Hurricane Katrina, Barack Obama, Great Recession, Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009/Obama Stimulus Package, Dodd-Frank Bill, Tea Party, Occupy Movement, Obamacare/Affordable Care Act, Obergefell v. Hodges, Black Lives Matter, ISIS/ISIL, Edward Snowden

Due:

Chapter 28: A New Century and New Crises

Read Chapter 28: " A New Century and New Crises” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
 

Americans with Disabilities Act, Bill Clinton, New Democrats, Hillary Clinton, Brady Bill, Don't Ask Don't Tell, Whitewater, Kenneth Starr, Newt Gingrich, Contract with America, Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act/Welfare Reform, Oslo Accords, Globalization, NAFTA, Rwanda Genocide, Operation Gatekeeper, Operation Allied Force/Operation Anvil, Culture Wars, Monica Lewinsky, Clinton Impeachment, Kyoto Protocol,Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act, Al Gore, Bush v. Gore

Due:

Chapter 27: From Triumph to Tragedy

Read Chapter 27: "From Triumph to Tragedy” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
 

Richard Nixon, Southern Strategy, Neil Armstrong, Vietnamization, Kent State Shootings, Pentagon Papers, Daniel Ellsberg, Henry Kissinger, Détente, SALT I, Realpolitik, Watergate Affair, White House Plumbers, CREEP, Deep Throat, Saturday Night Massacre, Spiro Agnew, Gerald Ford, Stagflation, Whip Inflation Now, Jimmy Carter, OPEC, Camp David Accords, Iranian Hostage Crisis, Ronald Reagan, Religious Right, New Right, Supply Side Economics, Strategic Defense Initiative, New Federalism, Immigration Reform and Control Act, Tax Reform Act of 1986, Bowers v. Hardwick, Sandra Day O’Connor, Black Monday, Iran-Contra Affair, Mikhail Gorbachev, Perestroika, Glasnost, George H.W. Bush, Saddam Hussein, Operation Desert Shield/Operation Desert Storm

 

Due:

Chapter 26:  The Triumph of Conservatism

Read Chapter 26: “The Triumph of Conservatism” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Cumulative Multiple Choice Test + 50s/60s DBQ
 
Students will take a cumulative multiple choice test and DBQ covering the 1950s and 1960s

Due:

Civil Rights Project

It is 1968 and, as a black student, you are proud of your heritage, but outraged by the prevalence of racism in the U.S.  Though the Civil Rights Movement seems to have already lost its greatest leaders to assassination, police brutality, and in-fighting, you believe that the most powerful black leaders have yet to emerge and are determined to fill the shoes of those who have fought and died for civil rights.  However, to mobilize your increasingly disillusioned brethren to continue the fight for racial justice, you have decided to join one of the major civil rights organizations and mobilize other African Americans to take up your cause.

For this project, you are going to act as a representative from one of the main civil rights organizations  (The Black Panthers, The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, The SCLC, and The Nation of Islam) and attempt to persuade other black students to adopt your strategy to push the civil rights agenda even further.

Your job is to create a booth with a colorful poster that has at least four pictures, a timeline that tells the story of your group, and your plan to reform American society.  Then, on ________ we will have a class-wide civil rights fair in which you will attempt to convince other students to join your group.  Your group must choose to represent one of the following groups:

The SCLC

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)

The Nation of Islam

The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense (The Black Panthers)

Though you might disagree with the position your group has been assigned, your job is to defend their strategy with evidence from the textbook and the attached readings.  To earn an A on the project, your group MUST cite at least one quote from the attached readings on your poster.  You can earn extra credit by using more than one quote.  When you have presented your group’s proposal, you must be prepared to answer questions from your teacher.  After the fair, all students will have a chance to join a group other than their own.  The group that gets the most members will earn 5 bonus points.  For extra credit, you may respectfully dress up as one of the activists from your group.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
 

Feminine Mystique, John F. Kennedy, New Frontier, Michael Harrington, Peace Corps, Bay of Pigs Invasion, Berlin Wall, Cuban Missile Crisis, Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, Moscow-Washington Hotline, Warren Commission, Lyndon B. Johnson, Great Society, War on Poverty, Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Vista, Head Start, Medicare, Ella Mae Baker, SNCC, Freedom Rides, James Meredith, Sheriff “Bull” Connor, Letter from a Birmingham Jail, March on Washington, “I Have a Dream” Speech, Civil Rights Act of 1964, Mississippi Freedom Summer, Fanie Lou Hamer, Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Nation of Islam, Malcolm X, Black Nationalism, Watts Riots, Kerner Commission, Black Power, Black Panthers, Affirmative Action, National Organization of Women, Gloria Steinem, Ms. Magazine, Roe v Wade, United Farm Workers, Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta, Rachel Carson, American Indian Movement, Students for a Democratic Society, Weather Underground, Yippies, Port Huron Statement, Free Speech Movement, Counterculture, Woodstock, Vietcong, Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, Vietnam War, Operation Rolling Thunder, Tet Offensive, My Lai Massacre, Robert F. Kennedy

 

Due:

Chapter 25:  The Sixties

Read Chapter 25: “The Sixties” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Cumulative Short Answer Test + 40s/50s DBQ
 
Students will take a short answer test covering everything we have gone over so far (including two questions straight off of last semester's tests) and a DBQ covering the 1940s and 1950s.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
 

Dwight Eisenhower, Checkers Speech, Interstate Highway Act, McCarthyism, Army-McCarthy Hearings, John Foster Dulles, Massive Retaliation, Nikita Khrushchev, Domino Theory, Ho Chi Minh, Battle of Dien Bien Phu, Geneva Accords, Mohammad Mossadegh, Jacobo Arbenz, Suez Crisis, Eisenhower Doctrine, Sputnik, Missile Gap, National Defense Education Act, NASA, Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro, U-2 Incident, Brown v. Board of Education, Brown II, Earl Warren, Thurgood Marshall, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, SCLC, Little Rock Nine, Orval Faubus, Baby Boom, John Kenneth Galbraith, Rebel Without a Cause,The Wild One, Beat Generation, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Catcher in the Rye, Elvis Presley, Eisenhower Farewell Address

Due:

Chapter 24:  An Affluent Society

Read Chapter 24: “An Affluent Society” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
 

GI Bill, Levittowns, Harry S. Truman, Taft-Hartley Act, Fair Deal, Jackie Robinson, To Secure These Rights,Executive Order 9981, Cold War, Red Scare, Josef Stalin, Potsdam Conference, Satellite Countries, Iron Curtain, George Kennan, Long Telegram, Containment Policy, Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, Berlin Blockade, Berlin Airlift, NATO, Warsaw Pact, Chinese Civil War, Mao Zedong, Chiang Kai Shek, National Security Act of 1947, NSC-68, Mohammad Mossadegh, Shah of Iran, Jacobo Arbenz, Operation Dixie, Taft Hartley Act, Federal Employee Loyalty Program, HUAC, Blacklist, Hollywood Ten, Alger Hiss, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, McCarran Internal Security Act, Smith Act, McCarran Walter Act, Korean War, 38th Parallel, Douglas MacArthur

Due:

Chapter 23:  The Cold War

Read Chapter 23: “The United States and the Cold War” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Students took a multiple choice test/DBQ on everything we have learned so far.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
 

Isolationism, America First Committee, Neutrality Act of 1935, Neutrality Act of 1939, WWII, Lend Lease Act, Atlantic Charter, Pearl Harbor, Revenue Act of 1942, Battle of the Atlantic, D-Day, Battle of the Bulge, Holocaust, V-E Day, Yalta Conference, Bataan Death March, Battle of the Coral Sea, Battle of Midway, Battle of Guadalcanal, Island Hopping, Kamikaze Pilots, Manhattan Project, Hiroshima, Nagasaki,  War Bonds, Ration Cards, Rosie the Riveter, Double V Campaign, A. Philip Randolph, Executive Order 8802, Tuskegee Airmen, Navajo Code Talkers, Bracero Program, Zoot Suit Riots, Executive Order 9066, Internment Camps, Korematsu v. United States, 442nd Infantry

Due:

Truman on Trial Activity
For this project, you will act as a prosecuting lawyer, a defense attorney, a defendant, or a witness in a trial to determine whether or not Harry S. Truman and other historical figures were guilty of crimes against humanity for the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. You are to use the reading and primary sources you are given to represent your position in class.Your assertions will be questioned and challenged in the mock trial, so be sure to understand your position.

Everyone in the class must take a role in the trial. We will need:

 

Five prosecuting attorneys
Douglas MacArthur and his attorney
Harry Truman and his attorney
Josef Stalin and his attorney
A white soldier and his attorney
A Japanese survivor and her attorney
Jurors


Prosecuting attorneys must work with the primary sources to come up with at least five questions for the witness they will be cross-examining. There should be two prosecutors per each defendant. It is the prosecutor’s job to assume that ALL defendants are at least somewhat responsible for the deaths of Japanese civilians. Prosecuting attorneys should share their questions with each other by e-mail just in case one of them happens to be absent.

 

Defendants/Witnesses must use primary sources to blame someone else in their answers to the questions of prosecuting and defense attorneys.

 

Defense attorneys must ask at least five questions of their client and protect their clients from historically inaccurate claims.

 

Jurors must write up a 2 page paper in which they explain why each defendant is either innocent or guilty of crimes against humanity. To support this argument, jurors must use at least 1 primary source and 1 in-class quote.

 

All students must understand their character’s position and speak in the trial. Bonus points will be given to students who dress in character.

Due:

Chapter 22:  WWII

Read Chapter 22: “Fighting for the Four Freedoms:  WWII” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Presidential DBQ
 
Students will take a DBQ covering two of the presidents we studied this semester.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
 
Franklin D. Roosevelt, First New Deal, fireside chats, Emergency Banking Act, Glass Steagall Act, FDIC, SEC, National Industrial Recovery Act, Civilian Conservation Corps, Public Works Administration, Tennessee Valley Authority, Agricultural Adjustment Act, Dust Bowl, Okies, Grapes of Wrath, Federal Housing Administration, Home Owners Loan Corporation, United States v. Butler, Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1936 General Motors strike, Huey Long, Share Our Wealth Movement, Dr. Francis Townsend, Father Charles E. Coughlin, Second New Deal, Rural Electrification Agency, WPA, Wagner Act, Social Security Act, welfare state, American Liberty League, Court packing, Fair Labor Standards Act, Keynesian economics, Eleanor Roosevelt, Indian New Deal, Mexican repatriation, Popular Front, Scottsboro case, House Un-American Activities Committee

Due:

Chapter 21:  The New Deal

Read Chapter 21:  "The New Deal" from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Chapter 20:  From Business Culture to Great Depression:  The Twenties, 1920 - 1932

Read Chapter 20:  "From Business Culture to Great Depression:  The Twenties, 1920 - 1932" from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
 
Sacco and Vanzetti, Jazz Age/Roaring Twenties, Flappers, Speakeasies, Bootleggers, "New Negro Movement," Harlem Renaissance, Henry Ford, assembly line, Charles Lindbergh, Warren G. Harding, Ohio Gang, Charles Forbes, Albert Fall, Teapot Dome Scandal, McNary-Haugen Bill, Washington Naval Arms Conference, ACLU, Schenck v. United States, Scopes Trial, eugenics movement,  Calvin Coolidge, Equal Rights Amendment, Adkins v. Children's Hospital, Herbert Hoover, Great Depression, 1929 Stock Market crash, Localism, Volunteerism, Smoot-Hawley Tariff, Reconstruction Finance Corporation, Hoover Dam, Hoovervilles, Bonus Army

Due:

WWI Outline/Introduction Test
 
Students will have ten minutes to write an outline and introduction for an essay about WWI.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
 
Big Stick Policy, Roosevelt Corollary, Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty, Dollar Diplomacy, Francisco "Pancho" Villa, General John J. Pershing, WWI, Lusitania, Zimmerman Telegram, Fourteen Points, League of Nation, Selective Service Act of 1917, War Industries Board, Bernard Baruch, Committee on Public Information, George Creel, 19th Amendment, Alice Paul, National Women's Party, Prohibition, 18th Amendment, Espionage Act of 1917, Sedition Act, Eugene Debs, Johnson-Reed/National Origins Act, W.E.B. Du Bois, Niagara Movement, NAACP, Great Migration, Marcus Garvey, Tulsa Riot, A. Mitchell Palmer, 1919 Steel Strike, Red Scare of 1919 - 1920, Palmer Raids, Versailles Treaty, Self-Determination

Due:

Chapter 19:  Safe for Democracy:  The United States and World War I

Read Chapter 19:  "Safe for Democracy:  The United States and World War I" from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

The Semester 1 Final will be held Thursday, December 14 from 10:45 AM to 12:45 PM.  It will have 35 multiple choice questions, 3 short answer questions, and 1 long essay question.  The test will cover everything we have gone over this semester so it is highly recommended that you review your outlines, flash cards, and previous tests.  You will be given two long essay questions to choose from.
 
Here are the possible long essay questions:
 
How did 1676 mark a turning point in the development of England's North American colonies?
 
Evaluate the extent to which the 7 Years War (French and Indian War, 1754 - 1763) marked a turning point in American relations with Great Britain.
 
To what extent did the American Revolution fundamentally change American society? In your answer, be sure to address the political, social and economic effects of the revolution in the period from 1775 to 1800.
 
Analyze the ways in which the United States sought to advance its interests in world affairs between 1789 and 1823.
 
Jacksonian Democrats viewed themselves as the guardians of the United States Constitution, political democracy, individual liberty, and equality of opportunity. In light of the following documents and your knowledge of the 1820s and 1830s, to what extent do you agree with the Jacksonians’ view of themselves?
 
Analyze the ways in which controversy over the extension of slavery into western territories contributed to the coming of the Civil War. Confine your answer to the period 1845-1861.
 
To what extent was late 19th century and early 20th century US expansionism a continuation of past expansionism and to what extent was it a departure?
 
Analyze the effectiveness of Progressive Era reformers in addressing problems of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In your answer, focus on reform efforts in TWO of the following areas: State and federal government, the workplace, living conditions in cities.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):  Theodore Roosevelt (as president), Progressive Movement, anthracite coal strike, John Muir, Gifford Pinchot, Panic of 1907, Muckrakers, The Shame of the Cities, Socialist Party, Eugene Debs, Upton Sinclair, The Jungle, Pure Food and Drug Act, Meat Inspection Act, Lochner vs. New York, Bill Haywood, IWW, Ludlow Massacre, Mary "Mother" Jones, Emma Goldman, Margaret Sanger, Muller v. Oregon, Robert LaFollette, Oregon System, Jane Addams, settlement houses, Henry Ford, Frederick W. Taylor, William Howard Taft (as president), Payne Aldrich Tariff, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, Election of 1912, Progressive Party, New Nationalism, 16th amendment, 17th amendment, New Freedom, Woodrow Wilson (as president), Federal Reserve Act, Underwood Tariff, Federal Trade Commission

Due:

Chapter 18:  The Progressive Era

Read Chapter 18:  "The Progressive Era" from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):  Rutherford B. Hayes (as president), Great Railroad Strike, James A. Garfield (as president), Knights of Labor, Progress and Poverty, Chester A. Arthur (as president), Civil Service Act of 1883, Grover Cleveland (as president), Trusts, Robber Barons, Social Darwinism, Andrew Carnegie, Gospel of Wealth, JD Rockefeller, JP Morgan, Theory of the Leisure Class, How the Other Half Lives, "The Significance of the Frontier in American History", Bonanza farms, Chief Joseph, Battle of Little Bighorn, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, Geronimo, A Century of Dishonor, Dawes Act, Ghost Dance, Wounded Knee Massacre, Chinese Exclusion Act,  Gilded Age, Boss Tweed, Looking Backwards, Interstate Commerce Commission, Sherman Anti-Trust Act, the Grange, Social Gospel, Haymarket Affair, AFL, Samuel Gompers, Munn v. Illinois, Wabash v. Illinois, Women's Christian Temperance Union, Carrie Chapman Catt, National American Woman Suffrage Association, Benjamin Harrison (as president), Omaha Convention, Populist Party, Coxey's Army, Pullman Strike, In re Debs, William Jennings Bryan, Election of 1896, New South, Jim Crow Segregation, literacy test, poll tax, grandfather clause, Plessy v. Ferguson, Atlanta Compromise, Booker T. Washington, WEB Dubois, lynching, new immigrants, Queen Liluokalani, annexation of Hawaii, William McKinley (as president), Influence of Sea Power upon History, yellow press, Sinking of the Maine, Teller Amendment, Spanish-American War, Battle of San Juan Hill, Platt Amendment, Philippine-American War, Emilio Aguinaldo, Open Door Policy, Insular Cases, Anti-Imperialist League

Due:

Chapter 17:  America's Boundaries at Home and Abroad

Read Chapter 17: “America's Boundaries at Home and Abroad” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Chapter 16:  America's Gilded Age

Read Chapter 16: “America's Gilded Age” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Prepare for a multiple choice/short answer/introduction test on everything we have learned so far.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):  John Tyler (as president), Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman, the Amistad, Denmark Vesey's Conspiracy,  Nat Turner's Rebellion, Shakers, Oneida, Brook Farm, Robert Owen, New Harmony, Temperance Movement, American Temperance Society, Common Schools, Horace Mann, American Colonization Society, David Walker, An Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World, William Lloyd Garrison, The Liberator, American Anti-Slavery Society, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Frederick Douglass, Gag Rule, Dorothea Dix, Angelina and Sarah Grimke, Women's Suffrage, Feminism, Seneca Falls Convention, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Susan B Anthony, Liberty Party, Texas Revolt, Battle of the Alamo, Lone Star Republic, James K. Polk, Mexican-American War, Spot Resolution, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Gadsden Purchase, Gold Rush, Commodore Matthew Perry, Wilmot Proviso, Free Soil Party, Compromise of 1850, Fugitive Slave Act, Ostend Manifesto, Kansas-Nebraska Act, Know-Nothing Party, Republican Party, Bleeding Kansas, Dred Scott v. Sanford, Lincoln-Douglas Debates, Harpers Ferry, John Brown, Election of 1860, Abraham Lincoln (as president), Crittenden Compromise, Fort Sumter, Civil War, Battle of Antietam, Emancipation Proclamation, Radical Republicans, New York City Draft Riots, Copperheads, Ex Parte Milligan, Homestead Act, Transcontinental Railroad, Navajo's Long Walk, Battle of Gettysburg, Gettysburg Address, Sherman's March, Lincoln's Ten Percent Plan, Wade-Davis Bill, Thirteenth Amendment, Battle of Appomattox Courthouse, Freedmen's Bureau, Sharecropping, Andrew Johnson (as president), Presidential Reconstruction, Black Codes, Civil Rights Bill of 1866, Fourteenth Amendment, Reconstruction Act, Tenure of Office Act, Impeachment of Andrew Johnson, Fifteenth Amendment, Ulysses S. Grant (as president), Radical Reconstruction, Carpetbaggers, Scalawags, Enforcement Acts, Civil Rights Act of 1875, Redeemers, Compromise of 1877

Due:

Chapter 15:  Reconstruction

Read Chapter 15: “Reconstruction” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Chapter 14:  A New Birth of Freedom:  The Civil War

Read Chapter 14: “A New Birth of Freedom: The Civil War” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Chapter 13:  A House Divided Part 2 Outline

Read pages 472 – 499 of Chapter 13: “A House Divided” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Chapter 13:  A House Divided Part 1 Outline

Read pages 459 – 472 of Chapter 13: “A House Divided” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Students will write a DBQ about the 19th century reform movements.

Due:

Chapter 12:  "An Age of Reform" Outline

Read Chapter 12 of Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Chapter 11:  "The Peculiar Institution" Outline

Read Chapter 11 of Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

  • Students will take a multiple choice test/short answer test covering everything they have learned in class thus far.
  •  

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):  Cotton Gin, Lowell Mill, Nativism, Dartmouth College v. Woodward, Gibbons v. Ogden, Adams Onis Treaty, Manifest Destiny, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Walden, Second Great Awakening, Joseph Smith, Brigham Young, Cult of Domesticity, Dorr War, Democracy in America (1833), Panic of 1819, McCulloch v. Maryland, Era of Good Feelings, James Monroe, Missouri Compromise, Monroe Doctrine, Election of 1824, Corrupt Bargain of 1824, John Quincy Adams, Election of 1828, Andrew Jackson (as president), spoils system, Whigs (American political party), Tariff of Abominations, Exposition and Protest, Webster-Hayne Debate, Nullification Crisis, Force Act, Indian Removal Act, Worcester v. Georgia, Trail of Tears, Martin Van Buren (as president), Bank War, Nicholas Biddle, pet banks, Panic of 1837, Election of 1840, William Henry Harrison (as president)

Due:

Chapter 10:  "Democracy in America" Part 2 Outline

Read pages 367 – 382 of Chapter 10:  "Democracy in America" of Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Extra Credit 12 Question Multiple Choice Exam due Monday (this was given to you in class -- if for some reason you do not have a copy, please let me know at bpolish@champscharter.org)

Due:

Chapter 10:  "Democracy in America" Part 1 Outline

Read pages 347 - 366 of Chapter 10:  "Democracy in America" of Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Chapter 9:  "The Market Revolution" Outline

Read Chapter 9: "The Market Revolution" from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Students will take a DBQ on the presidencies of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):  George Washington (as President), Democratic Republicans (political party), Federalists (political party), First Bank of the United States, French Revolution, Citizen Genet Affair, Jay's Treaty, Whiskey Rebellion, Washington's Farewell Address, Election of 1796, John Adams (as President), XYZ Affair, Quasi War, Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798, Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions, Revolution of 1800, Thomas Jefferson (as President), Haitian Revolution, Gabriel Prosser, Louisiana Purchase, Lewis and Clark expedition, Sacagawea, John Marshall, Midnight Judges, Marbury vs. Mardison, Barbary Wars, Impressment, Embargo Act, Non-Intercourse Act, James Madison (as President), Macon's Bill No 2, Tecumseh, Tenskwatawa, Battle of Tippecanoe, War of 1812, Battle of New Orleans, Treaty of Ghent, Hartford Convention, The American System, Internal Improvements, Tariff of 1816, Second Bank of the United States, Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, John Calhoun, Great Triumvirate

Due:

Chapter 8:  "Securing the Republic" Outline

Read Chapter 8:  "Securing the Republic" and pages 353 – 355 of Chapter 10 “Democracy in America” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Students will take a multiple choice test/short answer test covering everything they have learned in class thus far.

Due:

Chapter 7:  "Founding a Nation" Outline

Read “Chapter 7:  "Founding a Nation” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Chapter 6:  The Revolution Within Outline

Read “Chapter 6:  The Revolution Within” from Give Me Liberty.  Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Students will write the attached American Revolution DBQ in class without any notes.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet): French and Indian War, 7 Years War, Albany Plan of Union, Writs of Assistance, Proclamation of 1763, Pontiac's Rebellion, Currency Act, Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Quartering Act, Stamp Act Congress, Sons and Daughters of Liberty, Declaratory Act, Townshend Acts, Boston Massacre, Gaspee Incident, Tea Act, Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts, Quebec Act, First Continental Congress, Lexington and Concord, Second Continental Congress, Olive Branch Petition, Common Sense, Declaration of Independence, Battle of Yorktown

Due:

Print out "The Road to Revolution" packet and read it in its entirety.

Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet): Founding of Jamestown, House of Burgesses, Pilgrims land at Plymouth Rock, Mayflower Compact, Mercantilism, Navigation Acts, First Great Awakening, Jonathan Edwards, George Whitefield, Molasses Act, Trial of John Peter Zenger, Stono Rebellion, Negro Act of 1740, French and Indian War, 7 Years War, Albany Plan of Union, Writs of Assistance, Proclamation of 1763, Pontiac's Rebellion, Stamp Act, King George III, George Grenville, Stamp Act Congress, Sons and Daughters of Liberty, Stamp Act Repeal

Due:

In class you will be expected to write the “English Colonies in America DBQ” essay without any notes.

Due:

Print out "The Gathering Storm" packet and read it in its entirety.

Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

One member of your group must e-mail your group's English Colonies in America body paragraph to bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am Friday

Due:

 Students will take a multiple choice test covering everything they have learned about the colonial era thus far.

Due:

Create handwritten flash cards for the following terms IN YOUR OWN WORDS (do not use quizlet):
Columbus lands in the Bahamas, English Reformation, Richard Grenville lands in Roanoke, Defeat of the Spanish Armada, English settle Jamestown, French settle Quebec, House of Burgesses, First African servants brought to British colonies, Puritans land at Plymouth Rock, Mayflower Compact, Massachusetts Bay Colony established, Pequot War, Founding of Rhode Island, Anne Hutchinson's Trial, New England Confederation, Maryland Toleration Act, Navigation Acts, Halfway Covenant, King Philip’s War, Bacon's Rebellion, Pueblo Revolt, Founding of Pennsylvania, Dominion of New England, Glorious Revolution, Salem Witch Trials, Stono Rebellion

Due:

Print out "The English Transplantations" packet and read it in its entirety.

Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats

Due:

Read the second chapter from Howard Zinn's A People's History of the U.S.: "Drawing the Color Line." I recommend you use the textbook, but if you want to use a slightly edited version, it is available online through the following link:
http://www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/zinncolorline.html

Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it.  Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Print out "The Meeting of Cultures" packet and read it in its entirety.

Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

Read the first chapter from Howard Zinn's A People's History of the U.S.: "Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress." I recommend you use the textbook, but if you want to use a slightly edited version, it is available online through the following link:
http://www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/zinncol1.html .

Then, open up the attached outline and answer all of the questions on it. Finally, save your work and e-mail me your completed outline at bpolish@champscharter.org by 8:15 am. Remember that I can only accept documents that are in Word 1997-2003 or .rtf formats.

Due:

AP U.S. History Syllabus

Read the Syllabus. Then, print out the Student Can and Will Succeed Contract. Sign this contract and make sure a parent/guardian signs the Violent Images/Clips permission slip as well.

Due:

Read the pages 1 - 11 from Howard Zinn's A People's History of the U.S.: "Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress." I recommend you use the textbook, but if you want to use a slightly edited version, it is available online through the following link:
http://www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/zinncol1.html .
 
Then, read "Westward the Course" (pages 1 - 12) by William Bennet, which can be found below.

Finally make a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting what you read in the two documents.  You must fill it with at least 15 bullet points of information.