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Social Science

Mission Statement
 
The History Department at CHAMPS Charter High School provides students with an understanding of our history as well as how our society and the world works. We try to get our students to become active, caring citizens who have the historical knowledge and contemporary consciousness to make informed decisions.
 
 
WORLD HISTORY
Course Number: 2711
Grade Level: 9
Semesters: 2
Prerequisite: None
 
This course is designed to engage students in learning about the historical origins of the political, social, and economic foundations of the modern world. Students will analyze the development of modern political thought from its origins in ancient times to the events and people shaping our world today. Some of the topics covered in this course include: Ancient Greece, the Roman Republic, the spread of Western religions, the French Revolution, the American Revolution, the Latin American Revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, the Age of Nationalism, World War I, World War II, and the Cold War.
 
 
HONORS WORLD HISTORY
Course Number: 2711
Grade Level: 9
Semesters: 2
Prerequisite: Incoming assessment
 
This is an accelerated course that fulfills the state and district requirements for world history. Students will examine themes and topics in world history beginning with the origins of western political thought up until the major events of our current decade. This class will examine topics and themes including, but not limited to, the Industrial Revolution, the Age of nationalism, global imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Rise of Communism, the Cold War era, the post-Cold War era, as well as national building efforts of this century. In addition, students will pay particular attention to the ways in which these global changes have impacted the world around us.
 
 
U. S. HISTORY
Course Number: 2709 Grade Level: 11
Semesters: 2
Prerequisites: World History
 
This course is a survey of the critical, political, social, and economic developments in American History from “The Discovery” to the Election of 1992. Students will use primary and secondary sources to analyze and critique the developments of American history and culture. Students will trace the evolution of how the events of the past have shaped the United States. Led by the overarching question, “How does history help us define the American identity” students will study the various themes and time periods in American history in order to develop a better understanding of the development and growth of America.
 
 
AP U.S. HISTORY
Course Number: 2775
Grade Level: 11
Semesters: 2
Prerequisites: Teacher Recommendation and/or incoming assessment
 
This course is a survey of the critical, political, social, and economic developments in American History from “The Discovery” to the Election of 1992. The AP U.S. History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials – their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance – and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. This course will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.
 
 
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND ECONOMICS
Course Number: 2703
Grade Level: 12
Semesters: 2
Prerequisite: World History and U.S. History
 
This course is intended to introduce students to American government and politics. Students will analyze the structures of institutions that makeup the American system of government such as the fundamental characteristics and how the U.S. Constitution effects the organization of government: the historical perspective and influences of the Founding Fathers and the framers of the constitution; political behavior as it is expressed individually and collectively within our communities; and how and why the three branches of government are organized and the role they have in the policymaking process in the United States.
 
 
HONORS AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND ECONOMICS
Course Number: 2703
Grade Level: 12
Semesters: 2
Prerequisite: World History and U.S. History
Teacher recommendation and/or incoming assessment
 
Honors Government is an accelerated course that analyzes and reviews the United States Government, its functions and purpose. Students will pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American Government through comparisons of different systems of government in the world today. Students will analyze the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the current state of the legislative, executive and judiciary branches of government. An emphasis is placed on analyzing the relationship among federal, state, and local governments, with particular attention paid to important historical documents such as the Federalist Papers. This class will prepare students to take on the responsibilities associated with being an active American citizen, including voting, participating in community activities, and assuming the critical responsibilities of American citizenship. Students will demonstrate understanding through research papers, in-depth debates, and current event analysis.
 
 
HISTORY ELECTIVES
 
AP ART HISTORY
Course Number: 2870
Grade Level: 9-12
Semesters: 2
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and/or incoming assessment
 
AP Art History is a college level, survey course designed to provide an understanding and appreciation for western and nonwestern art and architecture in both historical and cultural contexts. This course is designed to engage students in the exploration of historical origins and development of Western and non-Western Art and Architecture. In addition it will prepare students for the AP Art History Exam. Topics will range from pre-historic to present day art and architecture, and will provide students with an opportunity to study and understand the major art periods and trends. This course will engage and inform students in Art History through assessments, written responses, group projects, museum field trips, posters, and oral presentations.
 
 
AP EUROPEAN HISTORY
Course Number: 2774
Grade Level: 10
Semesters: 2
Prerequisites: Honors English
Teacher recommendation and/or incoming assessment
 
The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of AP European History are to develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history; an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and an ability to express historical understanding in writing.
 
 
AP PSYCHOLOGY
Course Number: 2776
Grade Level: 11 and 12
Semesters: 2
Prerequisites: Honors English/Teacher recommendation and/or incoming assessment
 
The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and the phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.
 
 
INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Course Number: 2700
Grade Level: 9-12
Semesters: 2
Prerequisites: None
 
This course provides an introduction to the field of Cultural Anthropology. After providing theoretical foundations, the course surveys language, religion, world cultures, traditions, family, marriage, rites of passage, witchcraft, gender, and race. Emphasis is on the diversity of cultural patterns throughout the world and the essential humanity of all people. Examples from a wide variety of cultures are presented in a variety of formats.
 
 
SOCIOLOGY
Course Number: 2715
Grade Level: 9-12
Semesters: 2
Prerequisites: None
 
This course will focus on the ways in which society and group behavior shake our own being. “Our identity, fears, grievances, and satisfactions derive from socialization within groups.” By examining cultures, violence, deviance, social control, socialization and personality, group behavior, social class, and institutions of the past and present students gain a better understanding of both themselves and the world around them.